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QUIZ : Measure your chances of success with a Slavic woman

Russian women in Calgary are certainly more numerous than you might think. If you are familiar with the city center you probably meet them every day without paying attention. They are always well dressed, polite, and very beautiful, so it's hard to miss them. But by the way, how is the integration of women from Russia, Ukraine, Moldavia or Belarus going in Canada? One thing is certain, if they arrive alone in Canada, they will not take long to pair up with a Canadian man. In the first video, we present 3 Slavic women from Russia and Belarus who talk about the differences between the cultures of their respective countries and the Canadian way. Very interesting!

 

Russian immigrant women: Natalia from Moscow, Halina from Minsk in Belarus and Olga from Vladivostok in Russia 

The most amazing thing is that even though they live in an ultra-feminist environment in Canada, these three beautiful young Russian-speaking women have kept strong family values. Work should never be the main value of a Slavic woman. Nothing can compare with the happiness of family life and seeing your children grow up, Olga thinks. How many times have we received calls to CQMI from Canadian men who want to meet a Russian, Ukrainian or Slavic woman who already lives in Calgary. The goal is of course to avoid a trip to the Slavic countries and to contribute to a sponsorship process, which seems too long and risky to them. However, isn't going to meet your future wife in her Slavic country a clear proof of your interest for the country she comes from? It is true that Russian women are very beautiful and elegant women who know how to dress elegantly in all circumstances, but this is not the only one of their many qualities. Have you noticed their calmness, gentleness and respect for mankind? Don't you think that your life would be happier with a Slavic woman who looks after you and makes you feel good?

Where to find Russian women in Calgary ?

A year and a half of life in Calgary from a Russian woman


Good afternoon, dear readers. Recently ended another period of my Canadian epic. After a year and a half of living in the "cowboy capital" I decided to make a dramatic change of scenery and changed not only the city, but also the province. Not long ago we moved to Saskatchewan. The choice was a conscious, thoughtful and made of goodwill. Looking back, I want to summarize the stage we went through and share my impressions of Calgary, its inhabitants and surroundings...Only after leaving Calgary, I think, did I understand its atmosphere. I do not know why, but when I lived in the city, I could not feel it. Whether it was a prejudice, I don't know. Maybe a year and a half is not enough time to get used to and get to know any city. Maybe it was the fact that I moved to Calgary from Edmonton, which I really fell in love with and got to know. Or maybe it's the fact that I lived in the most non-Calgary area of the city, the North-East. Where it's really hard to capture the atmosphere and soul of Calgary. Who knows.

I would venture to guess that Calgary is not a city for everyone. It became an obsession for me even two years before I moved to Canada. I didn't know how or where immigration would take me, but I knew that I wanted to live in Calgary and only in Calgary! Not Toronto, Montreal, or Vancouver, none of those places appealed to me anywhere near as much as the heart of the Canadian west. The Wild West, the center of cowboy culture in the foothills of the beautiful mountains. To me, Calgary was the epitome of Canadian capitalism. A city of energetic and entrepreneurial people, where one could work and earn money, live an active social life and have access to recreation in the mountains. In the end, it was home to the Calgary Flames.

This is what Calgary "before" was to me. What did it really turn out to be? By and large, Calgary was and still is a model of Canadian capitalism, with its pros and cons, just as it was a hundred years ago. It's a city for people who don't want to go with the flow. A city of opportunity, a city of dynamism, but without the maddening rhythm that elsewhere seems to exist solely for the sake of the rhythm itself. This is not the case in Calgary. In western Canada, as I've noticed, unnecessary movement and pointless clutter are not in vogue. 

The undoubted advantage of the city is the opportunity to realize your ideas. The disadvantage is that you have to keep going round and round. You can't stop and take a break here. That's why, in my opinion, not everyone gets along here. And some become avid Calgarophobes. If we talk about our immigrants, tired of the fluctuations of Soviet socialism, not everyone wants to plunge back into the maelstrom, when there are many quiet and comfortable harbors around. Nevertheless, some people in Calgary manage to go with the flow and not give a rat's ass. But is it worth it?

Modern Calgary is commonly thought of as the oil sands of northern Alberta and the office centers of Downtown. But in my opinion, this is only partly true. Those who know the city's history will tell you: in the era of oil, and in the days of cowboys, and even when Americans were smuggling whiskey, Calgary has always attracted attention. Even today, while Calgarophobes scream that the city is emptying out and everyone is fleeing, it continues to be one of Canada's most steadily growing cities. The fact remains that at all times, people have come here for the relatively quiet life with great opportunities. For the spirit of capitalism, the relatively mild climate, the mountains.

I can tell you from personal experience, many in Alberta and Saskatchewan dream of living in Calgary. Both immigrants and Canadians themselves. In my opinion, even now, when Alberta is going through an economic crisis, the city is still a very attractive place to live and offers much more interesting opportunities than other Canadian cities that were not touched by the crisis.

I know that some people are lured by Calgary's mild climate. Mostly, this argument in favor of the city is made by people frightened by horror stories about terrible Canadian winters. And for one reason or another, who is not looking in the direction of Vancouver. Speaking of mild climate, it's worth understanding the relativity of the argument. Like statistics from wikipedia - it's interesting to study, but better to double-check. So, after reading wikipedia, one can conclude that Calgary is a warm, sunny city. For those who don't like frosty and snowy winters, this city is very, very much so.

Winter in Calgary is definitely not as cold as in Winnipeg or Saskatoon, and not as snowy as in Edmonton. There are frosts and very significant frosts, but in general, if you take the whole winter period, it's not snowy or cold here. Relatively. Or, a little less optimistically, Calgary's winter is nasty and disgusting. It reminds me of Kiev's. It seems to be there: minus 25 degrees below zero, and it can snow more than a lot. But on the whole, everything is very unappetizing. As for my taste, winter must be winter.

The same can be said about summer. Oh, that summer in Calgary! First the incessant rains. Then the constantly changing weather, when in the course of one day several times you change your jacket and hat for a T-shirt and shorts, umbrella for sunglasses. The evenings are cool, and the nights are cold. It's windy. 

There aren't many hot summer days. There aren't a lot of really hot summer days - the proximity to the mountains makes it all worthwhile. Sure, you can indulge in "sunny days," but for me, summer has to be a little different. What I really have no complaints about in Calgary is the fall. September through October is a fabulous time. Like everywhere else on the Canadian prairies, though.

Calgary's peculiarly mild climate, with chinooks in winter on one side and rain, hail and winds in summer on the other, affects the city's vegetation. I know, many Calgarians believe in the incredible greenness of their city, many are even proud of it. But it's hard for me, as an Edmonton resident from Kiev, to hear that without smirking.

Yes, there are islands of green oases in places, but overall the city looks pretty bald. I especially sympathize with the oddly-constructed spruce trees, as if they're living out their last days, with broken tops. There are a lot of them in the northwest part of the city. More to the point. Even the mega-mega-city of Toronto seemed much greener to me, and so when I hear about Calgary's parkland... Anyway, don't make my slippers laugh.

The north of the city is a pretty impressive area, where a lot of new housing is being and has been built, where entire neighbourhoods are growing in a few years, comparable in size to small towns, and where, in all likelihood, Calgary will soon reach Airdrie... Well, it is my profound conviction that the north of the city is an absolute crime against reason. A huge anthill without a single tree. And don't tell me those branches poked along the road are called trees.

It's hard to call it a city. It's hard to call it a one-storey America, I can't call it a cozy Canadian bedroom community. In my opinion, it is an anti-human monstrosity. Surprisingly, many people like it in Calgary. What's also surprising is that many people want to live in just such a place! At a time when Calgary offers enough more than decent neighborhoods to live in. And even the wonderful suburb of Chestermere, which is literally 5 minutes from Calgary. People buy their homes up north, blocking off the city's main thoroughfare, Deerfoot, at the same time.

If you go south from Downtown, it's a very different Calgary. The further south you go, the stronger the feeling gets. It's so much nicer and more fun. But it's incredibly far away from everything that is called and perceived directly as Calgary itself. Perhaps it would have been a lot closer if the road junctions had been a little more elaborate and convenient. They didn't seem that way to me. Although the quality of Calgary's roads is pleasing. So is the public transport system. The buses and subways are very conveniently interconnected and take you to all the corners.

 

Are you still hesitating to buy your plane ticket to Kiev in Ukraine or Saint Petersburg in Russia to meet the most beautiful Russian women in the world? It's because you probably didn't listen to the video report about our 3 beautiful young women from the East. Olga explains that Canadian men are better groomed than Russian men. They noticed that you dress better with more taste and style than men in Russia and Belarus. Canadian men do more sports and are careful about their weight so as not to have extra kilos. Did you know for example that the life expectancy of men in Russia is almost 20 years shorter than that of men in Canada? So you have a unique chance to make a difference with your physical shape and your beautiful appearance. Slavic women in general will look for a man who will be reliable and definitely ready to start a family in a model with traditional roles in which the man has a role of head of the family capable of providing for his family.

Valeria 25 years old from Kyiv

 

To Meet a Slavic - eastern European bride in Calgary :

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